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Be more Beethoven – the internal communications symphony

Are your internal communications more like the howl of a cat’s choir than the harmonies of a symphony? Are employees saying they are overloaded with irrelevant information and your data telling you that hardly anyone is receiving or acting on the important messages? If so, it’s time to ‘Be more Beethoven’ and implement a channel strategy to create an internal communications symphony.

The IC Citizen Manifesto

It’s just two weeks since I unleashed The IC Citizen and it seems that there’s a lot of enthusiasm for the movement within the internal communications community. A movement needs a manifesto, so Phase 2 of The IC Citizen will be about asking internal communicators what they think should be in our manifesto. The link to the manifesto survey is included at the end of this blog.

The IC Citizen explained

I’ve started a revolution, or more accurately a small movement. Since I published my blog about the concept of an IC Citizen, I’ve been astonished at the positive reception for the idea. It seems that the blog and concept have resounded with many other internal communicators. Before I move on to Phase 2 of developing the concept further, here’s some more information about it and how it could help the internal communications profession face up to a challenging future.

The self assembly change communicator

For employees, understanding organisational change can sometimes be like completing a self assembly project with no clear instructions or picture of the finished product. Internal communicators need to explain change themes not projects, use time travel to help leaders mind their language, and become great storytellers to enable employees to avoid the flat packed confusion.

Communicating in the perfect storm

When faced with extreme change and uncertainty it’s tempting to batten down the hatches, communicate as little as possible and hope that the perfect storm blows over. Unfortunately, saying nothing is rarely an option during times of change and to fail to plan a communications response is a plan to fail outright. The big question is, how do you plan to communicate when there is so much uncertainty and so many unknowns?